Home > Big Data and Hadoop, Internet of Things, SDN > Internet of Things (IoT) and storage requirements

Internet of Things (IoT) and storage requirements

September 23, 2014 Leave a comment Go to comments

On the news tonight I learned that the Indian spacecraft “Mangalyaan” built at a cost of $73.5M had reached Mars orbit after a 11 month trek, making India the first nation to succeed in its maiden attempt to send a spacecraft to Mars.  Granted spacecraft and Mars Rovers aren’t connected to the internet so can’t be categorized under the Internet of Things (IoT) today but who knows what can come to pass years from now…

IOT

The analyst firm Gartner claims that 26 billion IoT-ready products will be in service by the year 2020.  Sensors are everywhere (dare I say “ubiquitous”?) – from the helmets worn by football players to aircraft engines, from smart-watches to internet tablets, from luxury BMWs to microwave ovens, from smart thermostats made by “Nest”, from 9 million smart meters deployed by PG&E right here in California.    Companies like Fedex would like to embed sensors on all your packages so you can track their route to a destination from the comfort of your home office.  Appliance vendors like Samsung, LG, Bosch, Siemens are embedding sensors in your consumer appliances – LG and Bosch would like to take photos of your fast emptying refrigerator and send an email with a shopping list to your smartphone.  Granted this brings us to the realm of “nagging by appliance” ..   So it is going to be a cacophony of sensor data which thankfully we humans can’t hear but we will need to analyze, understand and act on.

Sensors by themselves aren’t very useful.  When was the last time you took notice of an auto-alarm blaring away on a busy street?  Sensors need actuators (devices which can convert the electrical signal from a sensor into a physical action)  Sensors may provide real time status updates in the form of data but there needs to be tools in place to analyze the data and make business decisions.  Examples of vendors who build such tools:

  • Keen IO – offers an API for custom analytics – what this means for you and me is that if a business isn’t happy with analytics using existing tools nor wants to built an entire analytics stack on their own, Keen IO meets them half way and allows your business to collect/analyze/visualize events from any device connected to the internet.
  • ThingWorx (acq by PTC whose head coined the term “product as a service”). He has a point here. In the past we signed up with cellular providers for 2 years of cellphone coverage – now vendors like Karma are offering a better model where you pay-as-you-go for Wifi – effectively relegating 2 year cell phone contracts to a thing of the past.
  • Axeda (acq by PTC) – whose cloud makes sense of machine generated messages from millions of machines owned by over 150 customers.
  • Arrayent whose Connect Platform is behind the toy company’s Mattel’s IoT Toy network enabling 8 year old girls to chat with other 8 year olds over the Mattel IM-Me messaging system
  • SmartThings (acq by Samsung) who offer an open platform to connect smart home devices
  • Neul (acq by Huawei) specialized in using thin slices of the spectrum to enable mobile operators to manage the IoT and profit from it.
  • Ayla Networks – hosts wifi based weather sensors for a Chinese company.

On the networked storage side, each storage vendor has a different view:  DataGravity recommends a selective approach to deciding which pieces of sensor data  (from potentially exabytes of unstructured data) to store.  EMC recommends customers buy EMC Elastic Cloud Storage appliances and store all sensor data on it (discarding nothing),  Nexenta claims that “software-defined-storage” is the savior of the IoT, SwiftStack claims that cloud-based IoT using OpenStack Swift is the way to go.

I think it is naïve to assume that all IoT data will need to be preserved or archived for years to come.   Data from sensors in aircraft engines may need to be preserved on low cost disk storage in the event of future lawsuits resulting from air crashes but there is little value in preserving a utility’s smart meter data for 7 years for regulatory reasons if the data can be analyzed in real time to understand consumer usage patterns, enable tiered pricing and the like. By the same reasoning does any vendor really need to preserve sensor data from my $100 home microwave unit for years to come?  However I see cloud providers focusing on IoT to need SSD as well as HDD based networked storage.

How about you?  What is your view wrt networked storage and IoT?  What unique capabilities do you feel need to be delivered to enable IoT in the cloud?  Any and all civil feedback is welcome.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: